Kemp's Hierarchy of Apparent Student Functional Ability

Scroll down this page to read about my AFFECT basis for determining a student's functional abilities for cases when data is missing.

 

Welcome to Pops Spedster's Place, where special education teachers, parents and students will find instructional supports and accommodations for people with intellectual disabilities resulting from low incidence and acquired impairments. At Pops Spedster's Place, we use Developmentally Appropriate Instruction (DAI) to teach academic and functional skills related to developmental assessments and Common Core State Standards.

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Kemp's Hierarchy

As Special Educators, we often have students entering our classrooms from other districts, either in the same state or from different states. The degree to which each state complies with the IDEA statute and the way in which each state interprets the IDEA statute vary greatly.

Often, the documentation that accompanies a student with low incidence disabilities is either incomplete, inconsistent as to standards, late arriving or non-existant. In such cases, Special Educators are called upon to develop IEP goals immediately to avoid a disruption in the delivery of services.

The DAI Assessment found on this website can be broken down into various domains and the probes published on this website can be used to inform team decisions about instructional design.

Kemp's Hierarchy suggests a basic standard for assessing the basic needs of such students. It uses an acronym to inform the most basic of teacher observations and probes.

The acronym is AFFECT. A-F-F-E-C-T.

The following list explains the meaning of each assessment standard.

 

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Kemp’s Hierarchy of Developmental Levels in Students with Low Incidence Disabilities


“AFFECT” (A-F-F-E-C-T)


AAttention. Is it possible to get the attention of the student?


F – Focus. Can the student focus on a task-related stimulus long enough to respond to the stimulus?


F – Fundamental Skills. Does the student have the most basic developmental skill set needed to complete a task?


E – Expression. Does the student have any observable mode for expressing appropriate responses to stimuli?


C – Cognitive. At what cognitive level is the student functioning; does the student have any ability to self-direct?


T – Trainable. Does the student show the ability to retain knowledge of the tasks being taught after multiple exposures to the stimuli?

 

 

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Baseline Instruction

 

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PROCESS CHART FOR DAI.
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THEORY OF HIERARCHICAL

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Kemp's Hierarchy

 

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THE ENTIRE DAI

ASSESSMENT SYSTEM.

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VERBAL COMMUNICATION

DOMAIN OF THE DAI ASSESSMENT.

DAI Verbal Communication Domain

 

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INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN PROCESS

DAI Instructional Design Process

 

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A VIDEO ON FACIAL

EXPRESSION RECOGNITION

FACIALEXPRESSION RECOGNITION

 

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A VIDEO ABOUT SMILING.

Watch A Smile

 

 

 

 

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Copyright 2009 Popspedster and Company
Last modified: 5/6/2016
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POPS SPEDSTER AND COMPANY
1627 GOLDCREST AVE. NW
SALEM, OR 97304

PHONE - 503-949-6776